Andrew Johnson Conquers Boston
A Patriot's Tour

by ANDREW JOHNSON
Photographs by Lisa E. Johnson


Duck Tours
The Boston Duck Tour boat
Boston and its surroundings hold so much for aficionados of the American Revolution. The United States break from British colonial mandates and ultimate road to freedom ran through not only Boston but Concord and Lexington. There are so many places that exude history at every turn. Instead of taking a hotel room in Boston, my family and I decided to stay at a “Bed and Breakfast” in Littleton, Massachusetts – The Lyttleton Inn (spelled in this manner). Hostess Mary was an exceptional person who always was there to give us directions and tips on traveling and eating. She also served the most delicious breakfasts each morning, her scones being the most delicious we ever experienced.

The Inn itself is a 19th century house, the last residence of Hannah Dodge, the first woman superintendent and member of the Littleton Lyceum. Mary has brought it up to speed with renovations accommodating the modern guest, but still retaining the centuries old flavor. Books for every taste abound everywhere. My wife and I were in the Mariner Room replete with reading material in the seafaring mode. My daughter had the Romantic Room with books in that vein. A sitting room with TV and music always softly playing add to the ambience of the place. Breakfast is served in The Tea Room. There is ample space to park for guests occupying the five rooms that make up the sleeping quarters. I would certainly recommend this as the place to stay when in the vicinity.

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The Minute Man Monument
the site of The Shot Heard Around the World
There is so much to see historically as one relives history. The highlights which I particularly found worth seeing:

Walking The Freedom Trail in Boston is another must. Standout sights included Faneuil Hall, Quincy Market, Paul Revere’s house, and the famed Old North Church where the lanterns were hung “one if by land, two if by sea,” the famous signal which informed the Colonists of what route the British soldiers were taking.

In Boston, we took a Duck Tour around the city and into the water as well. Code-named DUKW, the “Duck” was actually a general Motors truck enclosed in a water-tight shell and engineered to run on land and water. During the early days of World War II, both men and cargo from ships could be unloaded where facilities to dock were not possible. These vehicles played a great role in the allied invasion of Europe and the Pacific, and of course, D-Day. More than 40% of all supplies in Normandy were transported via the DUKWs. A total of 21,000 such vehicles were built during the war. Boston Duck Tours currently has original and modified DUKWs. Imagine a few lasting that long! And what a marvel going from the Boston city streets into the water, a car becoming a boat!

Walking The Freedom Trail in Boston is another must. Standout sights included Faneuil Hall, Quincy Market, Paul Revere’s house, and the famed Old North Church where the lanterns were hung “one if by land, two if by sea,” the famous signal which informed the Colonists of what route the British soldiers were taking. Walking The Freedom Trail in Boston is another must. Standout sights included Faneuil Hall, Quincy Market, Paul Revere’s house, and the famed Old North Church where the lanterns were hung “one if by land, two if by sea,” the famous signal which informed the Colonists of what route the British soldiers were taking. Walking The Freedom Trail in Boston is another must. Standout sights included Faneuil Hall, Quincy Market, Paul Revere’s house, and the famed Old North Church where the lanterns were hung “one if by land, two if by sea,” the famous signal which informed the Colonists of what route the British soldiers were taking.
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The USS Constitution, "Old Ironsides"

Another Boston highlight is a visit to The USS Constitution. First launched in 1797 and nicknamed “Old Ironsides” during the War of 1812, it is still a commissioned warship. The tour is fascinating; one can go two decks below the top deck to see how 19th century sailors fought, lived, and courageously defended this fledgling country. Being six foot one in stature, I truly had to duck down a great deal on the lower decks and when going down the ladders in order not to hit my head. People were smaller in stature back then.

I would also recommend the “hop on/hop off” trolley-type buses to get around the city. These tours take you to historical places with the driver/guide providing information about the places in this metropolis. The “T” (subway) is also very easy to use to get from one place to another.

Then too, there’s Fenway Park, home of Baseball’s Boston Red Sox, which one may tour when a game is not being played.

And so, for exploration and insight into American history, a journey to Boston is truly worthwhile.



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